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DEVELOPING LEADERS WHO WORK
ACROSS LINES OF DIFFERENCE TO CHALLENGE THE STATUS QUO

Our Fellows Program is currently offered in New York. Over the course of a year, Fellows remain in their jobs while participating in five in-person, multi-day immersive seminars and engaging in online content between seminars. The program design is centered on group-based learning, self-reflection, and real-world application. Fellows receive training, practical tools and the space to explore their own leadership journeys while connecting with innovators across Unity's local and global communities.

A THIRD WAY TO THINK ABOUT AID

Patient capital investing bridges the gap between the efficiency and scale of market-based approaches and the social impact of pure philanthropy. Patient capital has a high tolerance for risk, has long time horizons, is flexible to meet the needs of entrepreneurs, and is unwilling to sacrifice the needs of end customers for the sake of shareholders. At the same time, patient capital ultimately demands accountability in the form of a return of capital: proof that the underlying enterprise can grow sustainably in the long run.

We are seeing exciting new business models capable of bringing affordable, life-changing products and services to the poor. These businesses are transforming the lives of their customers, and are creating jobs that lead directly to economic growth.

INVESTMENTS NOT CHARITY

For Unity For Equality, patient capital is understood as a debt or equity investment in an early-stage enterprise providing low-income consumers with access to healthcare, water, housing, alternative energy, or agricultural inputs. Our typical commitments of patient capital for an enterprise range from $10,000 to $50,000 in equity or debt with payback or exit in roughly seven to ten years.

DEFINING PATIENT CAPITAL

The patient capital Unity For Equality provides is accompanied by a wide range of management support services nurturing the company to scale. In the long-run we aim to see a return of our capital. We do not expect high financial returns to come from investing in businesses that serve the poor.